Don's Fly Tying - The Plain Sedge Nymph


[Plain Sedge Nymph]

Winter is an excellent time to restock flies that are proven winners in your fly box. You should never venture into the numerous lakes of the plateau country just east of Winfield, BC., without an ample supply of sedge nymphs. What colour? I have found green to be the best, a fairly dark hue, but shades of yellow, brown and even black will at times work! This month we will examine a fly that is often overlooked as it is so simple in construction! The plain green sedge nymph has caught many trout for me and I know you will have success with it as well. Let's have a close look at this easy to tie wet fly.


Materials

Instructions

The plain green sedge is a very simple fly to tie if you have or make a dubbing tool to twist and then wrap the seal fur thin at the hook bend and thick near the hook eye. I make a dubbing tool by cutting the swab off a Q-tip and turn a tiny screw eye (the type you might use for picture wire hangers) into the stem. Then with a pair of needle nose pliers, just open the eye so that you can easily slip your tying thread into the eye. However, we are getting a bit ahead of ourselves because the first task is to attach a piece of gold tinsel to the hook shank at the bend. Now take a pinch of dark green seal fur and roll it into a thin cigarette shape between your fingers. Make a loop with your tying thread at the hook bend allowing it to drop about three inches down where you secure it with your dubbing tool. In other words, the thread makes a narrow loop or oval from the hook bend to the screw eye of your dubbing tool. Place the thin rolled piece of seal hair into the oval and begin twisting it tight with your dubbing tool. When the seal hair is very tight in the dubbing loop, wrap it hook bend to hook eye, thin at first and thicker as you approach the front of the hook. Now rib the fly with the gold tinsel, then back wrap the seal about half way down the hook shank and forward to the eye again where you will tie off. The final step is to add a very short and sparse grizzly beard hackle at the hook eye, ensuring that the beard flows back towards the hook point. Cement and you have completed the plain green sedge nymph, a must for many of our BC Interior Lakes!



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