Don's Fly Tying - Canadian Glory


[Canadian Glory]

The September/October issue of BC Outdoor's Sport Fishing featured Tom Johannesen's cohoe fly that he calls the Canadian Glory. Tom claims that a small size in the 8 to 10 range does attract salt water cohoes. As I had a Vedder River trip planned for early October, I wondered if his fly would also do its magic in fresh water? From experience on the Vedder, I knew that cohoe prefer fast streches of water where a weighted fly is a decided advantage. I therefore crimped a small split shot on the fly head and coloured it with fabric paint. It looked good in my tying vice but would it stand the test of those heavily fished Vedder cohoes?

Early October 2003 produced the most amazing run of pink salmon that I have ever seen in the Vedder. Also, the run of heavy white spring salmon, very numerous at this time the previous year, were mysteriously absent. However, there were some cohoe in selective sections of the river. After several drift rod sessions, I decided to try the water with my fly rod above the gravel pit parking area where the canal turns eastward. I knew there were cohoe present as I talked to a roe fisherman who had just caught and released his fourth cohoe of the day. He invited me to try his spot so I tied on the weighted Canadian Glory fly as my first test in the Vedder. Sure enough, after several unproductive close in casts, a bright fish took the fly in faster water just past mid-stream. I would like to say that I beached a cohoe but the fish after clearly showing itself in top swirls, snapped my 6 pound leader! However, it did convince me that Tom's fly would work as a river fly so I would like to share the modified version that I tie as November's fly tying article!.


Materials

Instructions

Open a small split shot and crimp it just behind the hook eye. Some work at shaping it with needle nose pliers may be necessary due to the thickness of the hook shank. I then cement it firmly in place and after allowing it to dry, I dab the lead with red dimensional fabric paint, available in sewing shops. The fly eyes are then made with a dab of black paint on each side of the head. It is best to prepare a few hooks in this manner and allow the paint to dry for a few hours before proceeding to the next step. When dry, wind your gold tinsel hook bend to the split shot, followed by the red crystal hair rib and tie off. Next, tie in a wing of red calf's tail and overlay it with white calf's tail mixed with a few strands of gold crystal hair. Cement, tie off, and you have finished my weighted version of the Canadian Glory cohoe fly!



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